CW House

CW House

    About CW House

    The William Randolph Lodging, affectionately known as the CW House, is nestled in the heart of Colonial Williamsburg. The house is a beautiful white colonial home, wonderfully accented with green doors and shutters. The interior of the home is complete with rich wooden walls and floors, a cozy fireplace and 18th-century reproduction furniture. The backyard offers a lovely terrace and lush gardens.

    The house was originally built in 1737 and was used as the temporary Williamsburg home for the Honourable William Randolph, Jr., Esq. from Hanover County, Virginia during his service in the Colonial Capital. As with much of Colonial Williamsburg, the house is a reconstruction and was completed in 1949.

    The College Connection

    Each year, the College of William and Mary awards a pair of rising seniors the opportunity to live in the William Randolph Lodgings. The two students are selected by a committee of Colonial Williamsburg Foundation representatives and College administrators based upon their joint programming ideas to enhance the collaboration between the College of William and Mary and Colonial Williamsburg.

    We have paired technology with their programming to promote student involvement in the history that surrounds them. We will be maintaining a blog on our life in the Historic Area of Colonial Williamsburg, and offer a schedule of upcoming events and opportunities for students in CW.

    We will host several events throughout the year, both at the CW House and on campus.

    We look forward to seeing you all at our future events over the next year!

    History of the Home’s First Residents

    A true Virginian, William Randolph served as a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses in 1718 and then again in 1720 through 1726, in addition to his involvement as a member of Council between 1728 and 1742 and Treasurer of the Colony in 1737. He was Royal Councillor of State in 1737 at Virginia. His father, Col. William Randolph, was one of the founders and first trustees of the College of William and Mary. Peyton Randolph, the great patriot who served as President of the 1st Continental Congress, was William Randolph, Jr.’s nephew. William Randolph’s death in 1742, left 3 of his children orphaned. Colonel Peter Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson’s father, assumed responsibility for the care and rearing of the young Randolphs—allowing Randolph’s descendents to be raised alongside Thomas Jefferson.

    Past residents of the CW House.

    Posts by CW House

    The History of Grand Illumination

    Since 1934, Colonial Williamsburg has wowed visitors with Grand Illumination, an annual tradition celebrating the holiday season in the Historic Area. With fireworks, musical

    Season’s Greetings

    As Thanksgiving and Christmas approach, Colonial Williamsburg and the surrounding area prepare to celebrate the rich history of the holiday season. Garland, wreaths, and

    Please Sir, I Want Some More… Pork Pie

    “I do not pretend to teach professed cooks, but my design is to instruct the ignorant and unlearned (which will likewise be of great

    Cupcakes, Tea, and Ghosts… Oh My!

    It has certainly been an eventful two months here at the Colonial Williamsburg House. What with encounters with William Randolph’s ghost (or so we

    The Early Bird Gets the Banana Bread

    Hello everybody! Kate and I made it through the hurricane! The CW House is still standing—shutters and all. Colonial Williamsburg made every effort to

    There’s a Cure to that Dull Summer…

    Colonial Williamsburg is welcoming its newest residents!  Kate Hughes and I have been given the tremendous honor of becoming the residents for the 2011-2012

    (Image from history.org) “And Spring arose on the garden fair, Like the Spirit of Love felt everywhere; And each flower and herb on Earth’s

    Holiday Romance in CW

    Now that we’re feeling the winter chill in the air, it’s time to heat up your love life. To help you keep that flame

    It’s autumn in CW!

    As we get deeper into the heart of autumn, Grace and I are enjoying the explosion of color that has painted Colonial Williamsburg in